Your Comprehensive Guide to Veteran Property Tax Exemptions by State

When you own a home, one of the additional expenses you have to budget for each year are your property taxes. This is often a multi-thousand dollar payment, depending on the tax rate for your county and the assessed value of your home.

Your home’s assessed value is determined by a tax assessor and is often different than the appraised and/or market value of your home.

In fact, it’s often lower than both of these numbers, which is good news because that means you pay less in property taxes. (And don’t worry—it won’t affect how much your home is worth if you want to sell it.)

How Are Property Taxes Determined?

The assessed value of your home is usually reviewed and updated every year. After this value is determined, your local property tax rate is applied in order to calculate your property taxes.

Most often, property tax rates are determined redby county. For example, in Utah, the tax rate for Utah County is 0.615%, while in Salt Lake County it’s 0.750%.

How Is My Property Tax Exemption Calculated?

Most commonly, property tax exemptions are applied by reducing your home’s assessed value. Not every state does it this way, but it is the most common way you’ll see property taxes exempted.

So how does it work?

Let’s say you live in a state that offers a $5,000 property tax exemption off of your home’s assessed value. This doesn’t mean you’ll save $5,000 on your home property taxes. Instead, it works by reducing your home’s assessed value by $5,000 before applying your local tax rate.

Here’s an example:

Your home’s assessed value is $125,000, and you live in Jefferson County, AL, where the tax rate is 0.65%.

If you qualify for the exemption, instead of paying $806.25 in property taxes [$125,000 x 0.0065], you’ll pay $774 [($125,000 – $5,000 exemption) x 0.0065].

Exemptions to Property Taxes

Despite the fact that county governments are typically in charge of assessing and collecting property taxes, state law still typically governs them, which is why many states include exemptions in their legal codes.

While these exemptions can vary from state to state, nearly all of them have some kind of exemption for veterans who own a home. Click your state below to learn more about the veteran property tax exemption(s) that you may qualify for:

If you live in Delaware, there is not currently a property tax exemption for veterans or members of the military.

Alabama Veteran Property Tax Exemptions

Alabama has one veteran-specific property tax exemptions that you could potentially qualify for. This exemption allows you to be 100% exempt from all property taxes.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the 100% exemption, you must:

  • Qualify to receive a specially adapted housing (SAH) grant from the federal government
  • Own and occupy the home

If a qualified veteran has passed away, their widow or widower may still qualify, as long as they have not remarried and are still living in the qualified home.

How to Apply

To apply for this exemption, you will need to visit your county’s Revenue/Reappraisal Office. They’ll be able to answer any questions you have, inform you of deadlines, and walk you through the entire application process.

Other Property Tax Exemptions

If you don’t meet the SAH grant qualification, you could still potentially qualify for Alabama’s Homestead Exemption, which provides:

  • A 100% exemption of state property taxes
  • A $5,000 reduction of your home’s assessed value for county property taxes

While this exemption is not exclusive to veterans, you can still qualify if you are an Alabama resident who meets all of the required conditions in one of the following columns:

AGE EXEMPTION DISABILITY EXEMPTION BLINDNESS EXEMPTION
  • 65+ years old
  • Make < $12,000/year
  • Permanently & totally disabled
  • Must be retired
  • Can be any age

If you have questions about this homestead exemption, you can contact the Alabama Department of Revenue’s Property Tax Department by calling (334) 242-1525.

Alaska Veteran Property Tax Exemption

If you live in Alaska, there is a disabled veterans property tax exemption [AS 29.45.030(e)] that frees you from paying property taxes on the first $150,000 of your home’s assessed value.

The law also allows for a refund of your property taxes if you are granted the exemption after already making the payment.

How to Qualify

This exemption is available for servicemembers with a disability that has been rated 50% or more by the VA. In addition, you must also:

  • Be disabled because of your service
  • Own the home
  • Live in the home as your primary residence for at least 185 days each year

If the veteran passes away, the exemption can still be used by their surviving spouse, as long as they are at least 60 years old.

How to Apply

Because property taxes and exemptions are administered by the municipal government and not the state government, you must contact the assessor’s office for your borough in order to apply.

Each borough is allowed to set its own deadline and procedures for the application. This includes determining what supporting documentation is necessary to prove your VA disability rating and whether you will need to reapply every year.

Arizona

Arizona does not have a veteran-specific property tax exemption. However, you could still qualify for the state’s property tax exemption for widows, widowers, and those who are disabled.

The base amount for this exemption is set at $3,000. However, the law allows for this amount to be adjusted annually by each county based on the GDP price deflator.”

Because each county can adjust the exemption amount separately from all other counties, the total exemption amount each year can vary depending on which county you live in.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the exemption, you must:

  • Be totally and permanently disabled
  • Live in a home with an assessed value at or below the annually adjusted amount
  • Meet the annually adjusted income requirements

The income limitations vary based on a variety of factors, including whether or not you have a child living with you who is either totally and permanently disabled or under 18. Additionally, your VA disability pensions should not be counted as part of your income for the purposes of these limitations.

In addition, the exact amount of the annually adjusted limitations for your property’s assessed value and income is calculated separately by each county. The best way to find out the current amounts in your area is to contact your county assessor, as will be explained in the next section.

How to Apply

Because property taxes in Arizona are handled on a county-by-county basis, you will need to contact your county assessor using the links below:

They’ll be able to tell you the deadlines, forms, and any supporting documentation you will need for your application. If you have any questions about your income or other qualifications, they will also be able to help you through that part of the process.

Arkansas

In Arkansas, the disabled veterans property tax exemption relieves qualified veterans of ALL state property taxes.

How to Qualify

A veteran can qualify for the exemption as long as they receive monthly payments from the VA for one of the following disabilities:

  • Total blindness in one or both eyes
  • Missing or paralyzed limb(s)
  • 100% permanent service-related disability

Dependent children and unremarried surviving spouses can continue to receive the exemption after the veteran dies. They can also qualify if the veteran is missing in action or died while serving.

How to Apply

To claim your exemption, you will need to submit a letter from the VA that verifies your eligibility to your county’s collector. Surviving spouses and dependent children will also need to supply a similar letter. For more details, you can contact your county collector.

California

In California, property tax relief for disabled veterans is available through the Disabled Veterans’ Exemption. How much you qualify for depends on total household income; for the “basic” exemption, there is no maximum limit, while for the “low income” exemption, you must earn $62,614 or less:

LOW INCOME EXEMPTION
$209,156
BASIC EXEMPTION
$139,437

While California law sets the income limit at $40,000, it also allows for it to be adjusted each year to account for inflation. The same is true of the actual exemption amounts.

Disabled Veteran Criteria
  • Blind in both eyes
  • Loss of use of at least 2 limbs
  • 100% VA-rated disability that is service-connected

How to Qualify

In order to be eligible for the exemption, you must:

  • Qualify under one of the disabled veteran criteria
  • Own and live in the home as your principal residence (with exceptions made for veterans staying in a hospital or care facility)
  • Not have a dishonorable discharge
  • Meet the service requirements in §205.5(b)(1)(A)

How to Apply

As soon as you are eligible, you can file your claim for the exemption. The deadline to submit your initial filing is either January 1 of the following year or 90 days after becoming eligible, whichever gives you the most time.

If you qualify for the basic exemption, you will only need to apply once by contacting your county assessor for a copy of the Claim for Disabled Veterans’ Property Tax Exemption (BOE-261-G) form.

If you qualify for the low income exemption, you will need to apply again every year using the same form and process as the basic exemption. The deadline for the annual filing is January 1–February 15.

Late filings are accepted for both initial and annual filings; however, you will not be granted the full exemption if you miss a deadline. Depending on your filing date, you will receive either an 85% or a 90% exemption.

Colorado

Disabled veterans in Colorado can receive a 50% exemption on the first $200,000 of their home’s assessed value.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for this exemption, you must:

  • Have a 100% disability rating from the VA
  • Be discharged from service under honorable conditions
  • Own & live in the home as your primary residence

Veterans of the Colorado National Guard can also qualify, as long as they have been ordered into active duty by the federal government.

In addition, if a qualified disabled veteran passes away, their surviving spouse can continue to receive the exemption.

How to Apply

If you’re a veteran applying for the exemption, you must fill out the Property Tax Exemption Application for Qualifying Disabled Veterans form. If you need help filling out the application, there are instructions available online.

Once you finish filling out your application form, you will also need to gather a copy of your VA award letter as proof of your 100% disability rating. Both the application form and your award letter must be submitted to your county treasurer by the July 1 deadline.

If you’re applying as a surviving spouse, you will need to complete the Property Tax Exemption Application for Surviving Spouse of a Qualifying Disabled Veteran. Instructions for filling out this form are included at the top.

Because the exemption does not renew automatically, so you will need to reapply for it each year.

Additional Property Tax Relief for Active Military

Active duty servicemembers can also receive property tax relief by deferring their property tax payments to a future date. If you qualify, the State Treasurer’s office will pay your taxes for you and create a loan you can pay back later.

You can keep deferring your property tax payments for as long as you continue to meet the eligibility requirements or until the deferred amount reaches the assessed market value of your home.

The qualifications for the deferral include:

  • Not earning income from the home
  • Being up-to-date on all previous property tax payments
  • Being active duty on January 1 of the year you’re filing the claim for
  • Owning and living in the home as your primary residence

The deadline to apply for the deferral is April 1. You will need to contact your county treasurer for the application form and process.

If you do not currently own and live in the home, you may still qualify if you are currently in the process of purchasing it.

Connecticut

Wartime veterans in Connecticut can qualify for at least a $1,000 property tax exemption under CGS §12-81(19).

In addition, Connecticut also offers supplementary exemptions based on income and disability that can add on to and increase this exemption amount.

How to Qualify

To qualify for the basic $1,000 exemption, you must:

  • Have an honorable discharged from the military
  • Have served for at least 90 days during an approved wartime period
  • Be a Connecticut resident

If you do not have an honorable discharge because you are still actively serving in the military, you can still qualify for the exemption as long as you meet the other conditions.

How to Apply

To apply for the basic exemption, you must contact the tax assessor’s office for your municipality.

They will have the forms you’ll need to fill out and can help you make sure an original copy of your DD-214 form is properly filed with your town’s land records. They will also be able to answer any questions you may have.

The best way to find this office’s contact information is to visit your town’s website. Under the “Departments” menu option, you should find “Assessor,” which should provide the information you need. You can also Google your town’s name + the word “assessor” if you are struggling to navigate through your town’s website.

You must reapply every two years. The deadline to file your application is always October 1 of the year you apply or reapply, and you can start your application as early as February 1.

Additional Exemptions for Veterans

As mentioned earlier, Connecticut also offers exemptions that can add on the basic exemption amount. These supplementary exemptions are based on your income level and/or disability rating.

The income-based exemptions fall into one of two categories:

Regular Income

(See CGS §12-81g(d))

Low Income

(See CGS §12-81g(a))

Additional Exemption Amount + $500 + $2,000
Total Exemption Amount $1,500 $3,000

In order to qualify for the low income exemption in 2019, a your 2018 income must not have exceeded $36,000 if you are unmarried or $43,900 for if you are married and have a joint income filing.

There are also two disability exemptions allowed by CGS §12-81(21) for veterans with severe service-connected disabilities that resulted in paralysis or amputation. Which one you receive will depend on the extent of your injuries:

Lost the Use of
One Limb
$5,000
Lost the Use of Two or More Limbs
$10,000

Finally, if you are disabled and meet the low income qualifications you can receive an additional exemption amount of either “twice the amount of the exemption” if you are below the income limit or “one-half the amount of the exemption” if you are above it.

You will apply for the supplemental exemptions at the same time you apply for the basic exemption.

You can also qualify if you meet Connecticut’s legal definition of total blindness.
The citations for these portions of the law are CGS § 12-81g(a) and CGS § 12-81g(d), respectively.

Florida

There are three main exemption categories for disabled veterans living in Florida:

$5,000

reduction of assessed value

100%

exempt from taxation

Variable

depending on disability rating

A separate section of Florida’s legal code, §196.101, also allows for a 100% property tax exemption for veterans who meet specific conditions; these conditions will be covered in the following section.

The discount is determined by your VA disability rating. So, if you have a 90% disability rating, you will receive an exemption equal to 90% of your property taxes.

How to Qualify

All three main exemptions require that the veteran:

  • Has a service- or combat-connected disability
  • Has an honorable discharge from service
  • Is a Florida resident
  • Owns and occupies the home

However, each exemption also has its own unique eligibility requirements:

Partially Disabled Veterans
  • Have at least a 10% disability caused by wartime service
Totally Disabled Veterans
  • Have a disability rated “total and permanent” by the VA
Elderly Disabled Veterans
  • Be 65+ years old
  • Have a permanent disability that’s been rated by the VA

Finally, even if you don’t have a “total and permanent” disability rating from the VA, you can still qualify for a 100% exemption of your property taxes under §196.101 if you:

  • Are quadriplegic, paraplegic, hemiplegic, legally blind, or need a wheelchair to get around
  • Fall under the maximum income limitation adjusted for that year

For this 100% exemption, there is no requirement that the disability be service-connected.

If the veteran passes away, their unremarried surviving spouse is still qualified to receive the exemption.

How to Apply

All four exemptions use the same application form: the Original Application for Homestead and Related Exemptions (DR-501). The deadline for these exemptions is March 1.

Once you fill out this form, you will need to bring it, in person, to your local county assessor’s office, along with the required supporting documentation.

No matter which exemption you’re applying for, you will need to provide all of the documents listed in the first box below. Two of the exemptions also require extra documents in addition to this basic list; these are provided below in the second and third boxes.

Supporting Documentation for All Exemptions
  • A certificate of disability or a letter from the VA stating your disability % and gives evidence that it is combat-related
  • A copy of your DD-214 form showing your honorable discharge
Add. Supporting Documents for Elderly Disabled Veteran Exemption
Add. Supporting Documents for §196.101 Exemption
  • Disability certification from two licensed VA or Florida doctors
  • A sworn statement of annual gross income
  • Copies of the past year’s federal income tax returns
  • Copies of the past year’s W2 forms

The exact wording for this certification is available at the end of §196.101
A copy of these documents must be submitted for each member of the household

If you’re unable to file your exemption in person, a family member or legal representative is allowed to file on your behalf.

Additionally, if you have questions about any of these exemptions, including the application process, documentation requirements, getting a refund for missed exemptions, and whether or not you will need to reapply each year, your county assessor’s office can help.

Additional Military Property Tax Exemption

In addition to the exemptions available to veterans, Florida also provides active duty servicemembers with a special benefit that can offer property tax relief when they’re away from home.

The deployed servicemembers exemption is for servicemembers stationed outside of the continental US. The exemption amount is related to the percentage of time deployed during the year. Basically, if a servicemember was deployed for half the year, they’d receive an exemption equal to 50% of their property taxes.

In order to qualify for the exemption, you must be deployed outside of the US as part of an approved military operation. The deadline is March 1 of the year following your deployment.

To apply, you will need to fill out the Deployed Military Exemption Application (DR-501M) form. You should also attach any documents that prove your deployment was qualified, as well as the dates you were deployed.

Georgia

Disabled veterans in Georgia can qualify for a property tax exemption. The exact amount changes year to year, based on inflation, but the amount for 2019 is $85,645.

How to Qualify

In order to be eligible to receive Georgia’s disabled veterans exemption, you must:

  • Be a resident of Georgia
  • Own and occupy your home
  • Have an honorable discharge from service
  • Have a qualified disability

Georgia’s legal code outlines what constitutes a qualified disability, and you only need to meet one of the requirements. They include:

  • A disability rated at 100% by the VA
  • A disability that receives 100% VA compensation because of individual unemployability
  • A disability that is eligible for an award from the VA because it includes the loss of use of one or more of the following: hand, foot, or eye (including permanent vision impairment)

If you’re qualified and you pass away, your surviving spouse and minor children can also receive the exemption. However, they must continue living at the property (or at a property in the same county). In addition, your spouse will only remain eligible as long as they do not remarry.

How to Apply

The deadline for the application is usually April 1. If you apply after this date, you won’t receive the exemption until the next year.

Before you apply, you must first obtain a letter confirming your eligibility. To do this, visit your local GDVS Veterans Field Service Office with the following documentation:

  • Proof of qualifying service
  • VA disability rating letter
  • Proof of state residency

After you receive your eligibility letter from a GDVS service officer, you’ll need to take it to your county tax commissioner’s office. They can help you fill out and file an application form.

You’ll only need to apply once; once you qualify for the exemption, it will be applied automatically every year.

If you qualified for the exemption in past years but didn’t know it, you can apply for a refund of your property taxes for up to three years in the past. This refund is equal to the exemption, and you must apply for it within three years of your property tax payment.

Hawaii

Hawaii doesn’t have a state-level property tax exemption for veterans because property taxes are only levied at the county level and not at the state level. However, each county has some version of a property tax exemption for disabled veterans:

Hawai’i County
(See County Code Ch. 19, Section 19-73)
Honolulu County
(See County Code 8-10.6)
Maui County
(See County Code 3.48.475)
Kaua’i County
(See County Code 5A-11.6)
Only pay minimum tax
Only pay special assessments
Only pay $150
Only pay $100 minimum tax

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the exemption in your county, you must:

  • Be totally disabled because of your military service
  • Own a home occupied by either you or your spouse
  • Not sublet more than one room to a tenant

If the veteran died from service-related causes, the spouse can continue to receive the exemption as long as they don’t remarry.

How to Apply

Each county has its own form that can be downloaded online:

If you have any questions, you can contact the department using the information on your county’s form.

Additional Military Property Tax Exemptions

Maui County also has a full property tax exemption available to active-duty servicemembers who get deployed to a combat zone or hazardous duty area for any part of a tax year. You can apply for this exemption by filling out and submitting the Claim for Deployed Active-Duty Military Exemption form.

Idaho

Veterans in Idaho can qualify for a partial property tax reduction that can range anywhere from $150 to $1,320, depending on their income level. The different income brackets for 2019 are available online.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify, you must meet at least one of the following conditions:

  • A disability rating of at least 10% for a service-connected disability
  • A non-service-connected disability that qualifies you for a pension from the VA
  • Status as a former POW

In addition, veterans with a service-connected disability rated at 100% can receive an additional property tax exemption that does not have any income limitations.

How to Apply

You must apply for your property tax deduction every year by April 15th.

To apply, you must contact your county assessor for an application packet. You’ll need to include documents that show proof of your:

  • Income
  • Medical expenses
  • VA-rated disability

However, if you have any questions about the application or any of the additional documentation, your county assessor’s office will be able to help. There is also more general information available online from the Idaho State Tax Commission.

Illinois

The main property tax exemption in Illinois is available to disabled veterans. Depending on your disability rating, you could receive as much as a 100% exemption of your property taxes.

There are also other exemptions available to veterans living in specially adapted housing and mobile homes. Even active duty servicemembers may qualify to receive a special exemption.

How to Qualify

The requirements for the Disabled Veterans’ Standard Homestead Exemption are outlined in 35 ILCS 200/15-169. They include:

  • Having a service-connected disability rating of at least 30%
  • Receiving an honorable discharge from active duty in the Armed Forces, service in a reserve component, or service in the Illinois National Guard
  • Owning the home and living in it as your primary residence
  • The home having an equalized assessed property value (EAV) of less than $250,000

This exemption works by reducing the amount of your home’s EAV. The amount you qualify for depends on your disability rating and is separated into three tiers:

30% Disability Rating
50% Disability Rating
70% Disability Rating
$2,500
exemption
$5,000
exemption
100%
exemption

Because each exemption amount is organized into tiers, the disability rating listed is the minimum amount. Each tier includes all other disability ratings up to the minimum rating for the next tier.

What Is EAV?

Illinois law requires that assessments for property taxes be equalized to a median level in order to make property taxes fairer across different housing markets throughout the state.

To calculate EAV, your home is multiplied by 33.33% to reach the assessed value (10% in Cook County). Then the assessed value is multiplied by the state-assigned equalization factor for your county or township.

For the Disabled Veterans’ Standard Homestead Exemption, the amount you qualify for isn’t subtracted until after your home’s EAV is calculated.

Then, once it is subtracted, the adjusted taxable value is multiplied by your county’s property tax rate. The result of this calculation is what you will owe for your property taxes.

The requirements for the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) Exemption are covered in 35 ILCS 200/15-165 of the Illinois legal code, and they include:

  • Having received a specially adapted housing (SAH) grant from the federal government under 38 U.S.C. 2102
  • A veteran (or their surviving spouse) owning and living in the home as their primary residence

Because this exemption works by reducing your home’s assessed value by up to $100,000, you can be fully exempt from property taxes if your home is assessed at $100,000 or less.

The requirements for the Veterans Tax Exemption for Mobile Homes are provided by 35 ILCS 515/7.5. To be eligible, a veteran must:

  • Be disabled
  • Own and use the home as their primary residence
  • Have received a specially adapted housing grant for a prior home
  • Be a permanent resident of Illinois

All three of these exemptions can be extended to the surviving spouse after the veterans death as long as they don’t remarry.

However, to continue the SAH and Mobile Home exemptions, the surviving spouse must continue to own and live in the home. For the Disabled Veterans exemption, they may transfer it to another property.

How to Apply

To apply for the Disabled Veterans’ Standard Homestead Exemption, you will need to contact your county assessor. The application deadline varies from county to county, so you will need to contact your assessor to determine when your application is due and what documentation you will need to supply.

To apply for the Specially Adapted Housing or Mobile Home exemptions, you will need to contact the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs about your eligibility certification. Once this is established, they will forward the certification to your local assessing officials.

If you receive any of these three exemptions, you must reapply for it every year following the same procedures. Also, please note that if you qualify for both the SAH and standard homestead exemptions, you can only receive one of them.

Additional Military Property Tax Exemptions

In addition to the exemptions available for veterans who have separated from service, combat veterans who are still members of the Armed Forces can also receive a property tax exemption for the year they return from active duty service in an armed conflict.

This Returning Veterans’ Homestead Exemption provides a $5,000 reduction of their home’s EAV and can be added on top of any other exemption they qualify for.

In addition to the armed conflict requirement, a veteran is only eligible for this benefit if they:

  • Own and occupy the home as their primary residence
  • Are liable for real estate property taxes on their home
  • Served with a branch of the Armed Forces, Reserves, or Illinois National Guard

To apply for this exemption, you will need to contact your county assessor for details about your county’s specific application deadline, as well as any documentation needed.

Indiana

There are two main property tax deductions that disabled veterans can qualify for in Indiana. Both deductions work by reducing the assessed value of your home by the amount(s) below:

BASIC DISABLED VETERANS DEDUCTION

ADDITIONAL DISABLED VETERANS DEDUCTION
$24,960

$14,000

The additional exemption is only for homes with an assessed value of $175,000 or below

Veterans who qualify for the additional deduction should already qualify for the basic deduction, which means they can receive a total property tax deduction of $38,960.

Finally, in addition to these two main property tax deductions, a third deduction is also available for a very specific demographic of veterans. It is only available to those who were gifted their home by a nonprofit organization. The amount of the deduction depends on the veteran’s disability rating:

Disability Percentage
Deduction Amount
100%
100% of assessed value
90%
90% of assessed value
80%
80% of assessed value
70%
70% of assessed value
60%
60% of assessed value
50%
50% of assessed value

How to Qualify

The qualifications for each deduction include having a service-connected disability, being the owner of the home (or under contract to own it), and receiving an honorable discharge from military service. In addition, each deduction also has its own unique qualifications:

Basic $24,960 Deduction
Additional $14,000 Deduction
Gifted Home Deduction
Served during an approved wartime period
Be 10% or more disabled

Served for at least 90 days
Be totally disabled or at least 62 years old with a 10% or greater disability

Served for at least 90 days
Be 50% or more disabled
Received the home for free from a tax-exempt nonprofit

Surviving spouses may also qualify for the basic and/or additional deduction if their veteran spouse was eligible to receive it at their time of death. However, in order to do so, they must own the home or be under contract to buy.

They may also receive the additional $14,000 deduction, even if their veteran spouse didn’t qualify for it, but only if the veteran was killed in action, died while on active duty, or died during training.

How to Apply

The deadline to apply for any of the veteran property tax deductions is December 31st.

In order to apply, you will need to contact your county auditor for the proper application form(s). Once you have the form filled out, you will need to turn it back in to your auditor, along with one of the following documentation options as proof of your eligibility:

  • A pension certificate
  • A compensation award letter from the federal VA
  • A disability compensation check issued by the federal VA

You can also apply for a Certificate of Eligibility from the Indiana VA; once you have the certificate back from them, it can serve as your proof of eligibility documentation.

If you have any questions, including about whether or not you will need to refile each year, your county auditor will be able to help you.

Iowa

There are two different property tax benefits available to veterans in Iowa:

DISABLED VETERAN HOMESTEAD TAX CREDIT

IOWA MILITARY EXEMPTION
100%
exemption of tax levied on the home

$1,852
maximum exemption of taxable value

How to Qualify

The full homestead exemption is only available to veterans who own their home. You must also have an honorable discharge from any branch of the Armed Forces, which can include the National Guard of any state, as long as you meet all other conditions defined by Iowa’s legal code.

In addition, you must also qualify under one of the following requirements:

  • You have a 100% rating from the VA for either a service-connected disability or individual unemployability
  • You have received specially adapted housing assistance from the federal government

The surviving spouse or child of a veteran can also qualify for this exemption if they receive Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) from the VA.

To qualify for the Iowa Military Exemption, you must:

  • Have an honorable discharge
  • Have served for at least 18 months
  • Be a resident of Iowa

You can still qualify for the exemption if you served for less than 18 months because of a service-related injury.

In addition, the unremarried surviving spouse, dependent parent, or minor child(ren) can also qualify for the exemption if the veteran passes away.

How to Apply

The deadline for both exemptions is July 1. You only need to apply once; after being approved, the credit should renew each year automatically. However, you may occasionally be asked to provide documents that show you are still qualified.

The local assessor for your county administers both exemptions. However, the process and required documentation for each exemption is slightly different.

If you’re applying for the Disabled Homestead Credit, you will need to fill out the Application for Disabled Veteran Homestead Tax Credit form. Once it’s filled out, you will need to submit it to your county assessor before the deadline, along with the following documentation dated within the last 12 months:

  • A copy of your DD-214 form
  • Your benefits summary letter detailing your disability or unemployability rating (if applicable)
  • Documentation of specially adapted housing assistance (if applicable)
  • Documentation of DIC payments (if applying as the surviving spouse or child)

If you’re applying for the Iowa Military Exemption, you will need to fill out the Application for Military Exemption form. You should also submit a copy of your DD-214 form with this application.

If you have any questions, you can call your county assessor. There is also an extensive list of Frequently Asked Questions specifically about the Disabled Veteran Homestead Credit that you can check out on the Iowa Department of Revenue’s website.

Kansas

Disabled veterans (and their surviving spouses who have not remarried) can receive a refund of their property taxes up to $700 through the state’s Homestead Act.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for Kansas’s property tax refund, you must be a resident of Kansas and meet the following requirements:

  • Have an honorable discharge
  • Have received a 50% (or greater) disability rating from the VA
  • Have a Veterans Disability Determination letter from the VA
  • Have been disabled for the entire year you are requesting the refund for
  • Have a total household income below $35,000 in the year you’re applying for the credit

You will also need to have owned and occupied your home for the entire year you are claiming the refund for.

How to Apply

You can apply for a Homestead claim between January 1 and April 15 every year. To apply, you can either fill out and mail in the Kansas Homestead Claim form (K-40H), or you can submit your claim electronically using the Department of Revenue’s Homestead Claim portal.

Regardless of the method you use, you will also need to include any required documentation, including one of the following:

  • A letter from the VA that provides your disability date and percentage
  • An original Veterans Disability Statement
  • The Schedule DIS form completed by your physician

It is also recommended that you include the following documentation with your claim:

  • An original social security card or official government document that contains your full SSN
  • A copy of your photo ID
  • A copy of your real estate tax assessment statement from your county treasurer
  • A copy of your federal and/or state income tax returns for the current and prior year
  • Proof of income, including W2 forms and tax documents for pensions, social security income, SSI payments, food stamps, etc.

Finally, if you would prefer to receive a direct deposit of your refund, you will also need to include a voided check or deposit slip that includes both your bank’s routing number and your account number on it.

If you have questions about any of this documentation, you can contact the Kansas Taxpayer Assistance Center by calling 785-368-8222 and choosing option 4, followed by option 3. Or you can view their list of frequently asked questions online.

Kentucky

There is no veteran-specific property tax exemption in Kentucky. However, veterans can qualify under the state’s Homestead Exemption, if they are 100% disabled or 65 and older.

In 2019 and 2020, the exemption amount is for $39,300 of the home’s assessed value.

How to Qualify

There are two ways veterans can qualify for the homestead exemption; however, you only need to meet one condition to qualify:

  1. You have a 100% total disability rating from the VA (and receive VA compensation)
  2. You’re 65 years of age or older

In addition, you must also own and occupy the property as your primary residence.

How to Apply

To apply, you must fill out the Application for Exemption under the Homestead/Disability Amendment (Form 62A350). The deadline for your application is December 31.

In addition to the application form, you will also be required to submit documentation of either your age or VA disability status, depending on the requirement you qualify under.

After you’ve completed the application form and gathered your supporting information, you will submit this documentation to your local property value administrator (PVA) using the online alphabetical listing.

Veterans who qualify for the exemption do not need to reapply for the exemption every year, unless their disability is not service-related.

If your condition improves and you become no longer totally disabled, you must notify your PVA of the change in your disability status.

Louisiana

In Louisiana, 100% disabled veterans can receive an additional property tax exemption on top of the state’s standard homestead exemption.

To understand how these exemptions work, it’s important to know that the assessed value for a home is 10% of the home’s fair market value. So, if your home is worth $200,000, then its assessed value is $20,000.

Under Louisiana law, 100% disabled veterans can receive a total exemption of $15,000 of their home’s assessed value ($7,500 standard exemption + $7,500 disabled veterans exemption).

Because the
assessed value is only 10% of your home’s market value, this essentially means that you are exempt from property taxes on the first $150,000 of your home.

How to Qualify

To receive both the disabled veteran and standard exemptions, you must:

  • Have a 100% service-caused disability rating (or 100% unemployability rating) from the VA
  • Own and occupy the home as your primary residence
  • Not own more than 160 acres of land

The surviving spouse of a 100% disabled servicemember is also eligible for the exemptions.

How to Apply

In order to apply for these exemptions, you will need to visit the assessor’s office for your parish in person. This should be done as soon as you own your home or otherwise qualify for the exemptions.

When you visit your assessor’s office, you will need to bring the following documentation with you:

  • The recorded Act of Sale or Warranty Deed as proof of ownership
  • A government-issued ID or driver’s license
  • A recent unpaid bill for the property that is addressed to you (because not all parishes accept Sewer & Water bills, another type of bill that’s accepted in all parishes is recommended)
  • Proof of your VA disability rating

Once you are awarded the exemptions, you will not need to reapply as long as you live at the address. Instead, you will receive a renewal card in the mail each year. Simply review the information to make sure it’s still accurate and then return it.

If you move, you will need to notify the assessor that you changed primary residences. You will also need to reapply for the exemption on your new home.

Other Property Tax Benefits

If you are a 50% or more disabled veteran with an income below a certain level, you can also qualify for a “Special Assessment Level.” As long as you remain eligible for the special assessment, it freezes your home’s assessed value so it cannot increase beyond what it was when you first qualified.

The required income level is adjusted every year, so the best way to make sure you qualify is to contact the assessor’s office for your parish.

Maine

In Maine, there are two main exemptions available exclusively to veterans. Both are included under the section of Maine’s legal code that discusses the estates of veterans.

BASIC VETERAN EXEMPTION

PARAPLEGIC VETERAN EXEMPTION
$6,000
exemption of the just value

$50,000
exemption of the just value

In Maine, the “just value” has been interpreted by the courts to be the same as the market value.

How to Qualify

To qualify for the basic exemption, you must meet one of these eligibility requirements:

  • Be 62 years of age or older with military service during an approved wartime period
  • Be a veteran who receives a pension or compensation from the government for a total disability (does not have to be service-connected)
  • Have a service-connected disability (any rating) that qualifies you for VA compensation

To qualify for the paraplegic exemption, you must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Have military service during an approved wartime period
  • Meet the definition of paraplegia in 38 U.S.C. 2101
  • Have received a SAH grant from the federal government

In addition, for both exemptions, you must have been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable, be a resident of Maine, and own the property.

Both exemptions can also be passed on to the surviving spouse, minor children, or surviving parent of the veteran after they pass away, if they become the recipient of that veteran’s compensation. However, surviving spouses and surviving parents only qualify if they are also an unremarried widow or widower.

How to Apply

To apply for either exemption, you will need to fill out the Application for Maine Veteran Property Tax Exemption. You will also need to gather and submit a copy of one of the following documents:

  • Your DD-214 form
  • Your benefit summary letter from the VA

Once you have completed the form and gathered the necessary documentation, you will need to submit it to your local government (typically your municipality’s assessors office) by April 1. To find this information, you can find your municipality’s website, then navigate to the Assessor’s page.

After you have received the exemption, you will not need to reapply in subsequent years.

Other Military Property Tax Exemptions

Active duty servicemembers stationed in Maine can also qualify for Maine’s $20,000 homestead tax exemption.

Maine’s legal code for this exemption requires that you be a “permanent resident” in order to qualify. However, the law expands the definition of a permanent resident to include active duty servicemembers who are permanently stationed at one of the state’s military or naval posts .

Other qualifications for this exemption include:

  • Owning your Maine homestead for a continuous 12-month period (or longer)
  • Living in the home as your permanent residence by April 1

You can apply for this exemption by filling out the Application for Maine Homestead Property Tax Exemption form and submitting it to your local assessor by April 1.

You will only need to apply for the exemption once; it will remain in effect until the home is no longer your primary residence. If you move or receive PCS orders, you must notify your local tax assessor.

Maryland

Disabled veterans in Maryland can qualify to receive a 100% property tax exemption.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the full exemption, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You have a permanent service-related disability
  • Your disability is rated at 100% by the VA
  • You received an honorable discharge or were released under honorable conditions

You can also qualify if you are the unremarried surviving spouse of a servicemember who died while serving or because of their disability.

How to Apply

While there is no set deadline for your application, it is recommended to apply as soon as you qualify. You can download the application online.

After printing and filling out the form, you should mail it to your county’s assessment office. These addresses are provided on the second page of the application, as well as online from Maryland’s Department of Assessments & Taxation.

You can also call your local office if you have any questions about the application.

Massachusetts

Disabled veterans in Massachusetts can qualify for a property tax exemption that ranges from $400 to a FULL exemption. The exact amount you will qualify for depends on which conditions you meet, as defined by the following clauses in Massechussetts’s legal code:

Clause 22
Clause 22A
Clause 22E
Clause 22B
Clause 22C
Clause 22F
$400
exemption
$750
exemption
$1,250
exemption
$1,250
exemption
$1,500
exemption
100%
exemption

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for any of the exemption amounts, you must:

  • Own the home
  • Have a service-connected disability or injury sustained in the line of duty
  • Have been discharged under conditions that were not dishonorable
  • Have occupied the home as your primary residence by July 1 of the year you’re applying for
  • Have lived in Massachusetts for at least six months before you entered the military or for the two consecutive years prior to applying for the exemption
  • Be a current resident of Massachusetts

In addition to these general qualifications, each of the exemption amounts also has its own requirements outlining which veterans are eligible:

$400 Exemption
$750 Exemption
$1,000 Exemption
A 10% or greater disability rating from the VA
Was awarded the Purple Heart

Loss the use of one foot, hand, or eye
Received the Congressional Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, Navy Cross, or Air Force Cross
Former POW status

A 100% disability rating from the VA

$1,250 Exemption
$1,500 Exemption
Full Exemption
Loss the use of both feet, hands, or eyes

Received a specially adapted housing (SAH) grant for a total disability

A 100% disability for blindness
Has paraplegia

The spouse of a qualified veteran may also receive one of the above exemptions if they own the home or if their veteran spouse passes away. Additionally, Gold Star parents may qualify for the $400 exemption.

How to Apply

No matter which exemption amount you qualify for, you will need to contact your local assessor’s office for the application. This application is due by either April 1 or three months after your tax bill is mailed, whichever is later.

To continue receiving the exemption, you must reapply for it every year. If you have questions, you can contact the Department of Revenue’s Division of Local Services.

Michigan

Veterans in Michigan can receive a full property tax exemption if they meet the requirements outlined in the next section.

In addition, veterans and servicemembers who do not qualify for the exemption may be eligible for a property tax credit of up to $1,500. If you qualify, you must pay your property taxes and then apply for the credit, which will be paid out through your state income tax return.

How to Qualify

To qualify for the full property tax exemption, you must have an honorable discharge and be a resident of Michigan. You must also meet one of the following requirements:

  • Have a service-connected disability that qualifies for 100% compensation from the VA
  • Have received, or are currently receiving, specially adapted housing assistance from the VA
  • Have an “individually unemployable” rating from the VA

Surviving spouses may also qualify if their veteran spouse was eligible before their death, as long as they remain unmarried and are a Michigan resident.

The property tax credit is available to both active duty servicemembers and veterans (or their surviving spouses) who either own, rent, or lease a home.

There are a variety of factors that will determine the amount you receive from the credit, including your disability rating and income. However, the following eligibility requirements must still be met:

  • Your home’s taxable value is $135,000 or less
  • You do not exceed the maximum income levels ($7,500 for some veterans and up to $60,000 for others)

Because the acceptable income levels can vary depending on your age or disability status, the best way to determine if you meet the requirements is to contact the Michigan Department of Treasury by calling 517-636-4486, or you can also read through the General Information document.

How to Apply

To apply for the property tax exemption, you will need to fill out and file Form 5107. You will also need to gather the necessary supporting documents:

  • A copy of your disability awards letter from the VA (if individually unemployable or 100% compensated)
  • A certificate from the VA verifying your specially adapted housing assistance (if applicable)

You must reapply for the exemption every year by submitting the form and your supporting documentation to your local assessor’s office. The easiest way to find this information is to do an online search of your town’s name + assessor.

You cannot file until after December 31; however, the actual deadline varies depending on when your municipality’s December Board of Review concludes their annual meeting, though it usually occurs during the second week of December.

To apply for the property tax credit, you should fill out either Form MI-1040CR-2 or Form MI-1040CR each year. You will want to complete and file the form that gives you the larger credit amount.

The deadline is April 15 each year. To apply, you will need to include the completed form with your income tax return (Form MI-1040). However, if you don’t owe income tax and do not need to file a state income tax return, you can file your property tax credit form as soon as you know what your total household income and property taxes were for the prior year.

Once all the necessary forms are complete, you will mail them to:

Michigan Department of Treasury
Lansing, MI 48956

Other Military Property Tax Relief Options

There are three main additional types of property tax relief options for servicemembers and veterans in Michigan:

  1. Principal Residence Exemption (PRE) – Active duty servicemembers who own a home in Michigan but are stationed outside of the state may qualify for a PRE of their property taxes for up to 3 years.
  1. Active Duty Property Tax Relief – If you are unable to pay property taxes because of your tour of active duty, you can apply for property tax relief through your city or town’s treasurer.
  1. Deferment of Property Taxes – There are two main types of deferments in Michigan: the summer tax deferment and the deferment of special assessments. Which one you qualify for will depend on your age, disability level, income, and service.

If it sounds like you might qualify for any of these additional property tax relief benefits, the links above provide more information about how you can apply, including the application forms and deadlines.

Minnesota

In Minnesota, disabled veterans can receive a property tax exclusion for a portion of their home’s market value. The amount of the exclusion depends on the veteran’s disability rating:

70% Disability Rating

100% Disability Rating
$150,000
exclusion of market value

$300,000
exclusion of market value

If your home’s market value is below or equal to your exclusion amount, then you will be fully exempt from all property taxes.

How to Qualify

The main requirement for either exclusion is your disability level. For 100% disabled veterans, your disability must also be permanent. Outside of your disability rating, you must also:

  • Have an honorable discharge
  • Own the home and live there as your primary residence

Surviving spouses of deceased veterans may also qualify for up to eight additional tax years if they remain unremarried and continue to own the home, as long as they meet the specific conditions outlined by the law. Some of these conditions include receiving DIC payments and having a spouse die during active service, among others.

How to Apply

To receive the exclusion, you must contact your county assessor to get the proper form. If you qualify with a 70% or greater disability, you will want to request form CR-DVHE70. If you have a 100% disability, you will want to ask for form CR-DVHE100.

After getting the proper form, you will need to fill it out and return it to your county assessor along with the following documentation:

  • A copy of your DD-214 or other official discharge document that verifies your honorable discharge status
  • A copy of your disability award letter or other official VA document that verifies your disability rating

The deadline for your application is July 1. Applications received after this date will be counted toward the next assessment year.

You will need to reapply every year if you have a 70% disability. If you have a 100% permanent and total disability, you will only need to apply once; after your initial application is approved, the exclusion will be granted automatically each year.

Mississippi

In Mississippi, a totally disabled veteran can qualify for a property tax exemption of $7,500 of the assessed value of their home. This benefit is described in Mississippi’s legal code, specifically §27-33-67(2) and §27-33-75(2).

Because Article 4, Section 112 of Mississippi’s constitution sets the assessed value of single-family, owner-occupied homes at 10% of their true value, this means you are exempt from paying property taxes on the first $75,000 of your home.

How to Qualify

In order to be eligible, you must:

  • Have a service-connected total disability
  • Have been honorably discharged

The unremarried surviving spouse of a veteran who meets the above conditions can also qualify.

How to Apply

To apply, you will need to contact your county’s tax assessor to get an application. As part of your application, you must provide a copy of your Veteran’s Consent of Release (Form 72-042) as proof of your disability.

Finally, your application will need to be filed between January 1 and April 1. However, you will only need to apply once, as long as there are no changes in your homestead status (for example, a change in marital status or ownership).

Missouri

Veteran homeowners (and some renters) in Missouri could get a property tax credit up to $1,100.

How to Qualify

In order to receive the property tax credit, you must:

  • Have a 100% disability rating
  • Have served in any branch of the Armed Forces
  • Meet the income requirements

The easiest way to check your qualifications is to use the state’s Property Tax Credit Qualification Chart.

How to Apply

You will need to apply for the refund every year, typically by mid-April, though the exact date may change from year to year. The forms are available online, but they can sometimes be difficult to find.

If you cannot find the form, you can call 800-877-6881 to request it. Or you can email PropertyTaxCredit@dor.mo.gov with specific questions.

When you fill out the income section of the form on page 2, you can leave line 4 blank if your disability is service-connected. However, if you are 100% disabled but not because of your military service, you will need to include your VA payments.

You will also need to include a letter from the VA that states the amount of your disability and whether or not it was service-connected. If it is not service-connected, the letter will also need to include the total amount of benefits you receive.

You may also be required to include other documents with your application. You can find out what these documents are as you fill out the different sections of the form.

When the form and all supporting documents are ready, you will mail it to:

Department of Revenue
P.O. Box 2800
Jefferson City, MO 65105-2800

Montana

Disabled veterans in Montana can qualify for a program that reduces their property taxes.

The reduction is calculated by multiplying your property taxes by a percentage that is determined based on your income level and marital status. For example, if you are single and earn less than $40,389 per year, your property taxes are multiplied by 0%, which would give you a full, 100% reduction.

There are four different multiplier amounts, which end up equaling a 50%, 70%, 80%, or 100% reduction of your property taxes.

How to Qualify

Only 100% disabled veterans can qualify. Other eligibility requirements include:

  • Your disability must be service-connected
  • You must own your home, or be under contract to buy one
  • You must live in the home as your primary residence for at least seven months of the year
  • You must meet the income requirements (as adjusted for inflation) for that year

If you live on agricultural or forest land, your home and up to one acre of land can qualify for the reduction.

In addition, unremarried surviving spouses can also qualify for the reduction if their spouse died while on active duty or because of a 100% service-related disability.

How to Apply

To apply, you will need to fill out the Montana Disabled Veteran Property Tax Relief Application and turn it in to a Department of Revenue office near you, along with the following documentation:

  • An official letter from the VA that states your 100% disability rating
  • Your most recent federal income tax return, if you’re a new Montana resident
  • Documentation of your income if all of it comes from nontaxable sources (like your veterans’ benefits or Social Security)

Surviving spouses who are applying will also need to include a letter from the VA with their application. This letter should verify how their spouse died; specifically, it should define whether is was during active duty or from a 100% service-connected disability.

The deadline for your application is April 15. You will not need to reapply every year unless you sell your home or move. The state will, however, mail you a letter each year that states your current status.

Nebraska

In Nebraska, qualified veterans can receive a 100% exemption of their property taxes.

How to Qualify

There are three categories of veterans who can qualify for the exemption. However, you must meet all of the eligibility requirements in your category in order to receive the exemption. The categories and their requirements are:

Veterans with a 100% Disability (NOT from Service)

(Category 2)
Veterans with a 100% Service-Connected Disability

(Category 4)
Veterans without the Use of Two or More Limbs

(Category 5)
Owning & occupying the home from Jan. 1 – Aug. 15
Meeting income limits
Being a wartime veteran

Owning & occupying the home from Jan. 1 – Aug. 15

Owning & occupying the home from Jan. 1 – Aug. 15
Living in a home acquired with help from the DVA

Surviving spouses under the age of 57 who have not remarried, as well as those who did remarry after 57, can also qualify based on the category their veteran spouse would have qualified for.

For veterans in Category 2, you will only qualify for the 100% exemption if your income falls below that year’s limit. However, if your income is higher, you can still receive an exemption for a portion of your property taxes; the exact percentage you receive will depend on where your income actually falls.

How to Apply

Regardless of which category you qualify for, you will still need to submit Form 458 your county assessor between February 1 and June 30 every year. The first time you apply, you will also need to include certification from the VA verifying your disability status.

In addition, if you qualify under category 2, you will need to fill out and submit Form 458, Schedule I every year in order to verify your income.

The contact information for your county assessor, including the address where you will need to mail your application form(s), is available online. They can also answer any questions you might have.

Other Property Tax Exemptions

If you are a veteran who owns and occupies a mobile home in Nebraska, you can receive an exemption of your property taxes. In order to qualify, you must:

  • Have an honorable or general (under honorable conditions) discharge
  • Have a service-connected disability

Your disability must meet one of the conditions outlined in Nebraska law, and you must apply for this exemption by April 1 every year.

New Hampshire

Property Tax Credit for Wartime Veterans & Surviving Spouses
You can get a property tax credit if you’re a wartime veteran or the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran. To be eligible for this credit, you must:

Have an honorable discharge from the military or have been released because of a service-related disability
Have served for at least 90 days on active duty in a qualifying war or armed conflict (which can include Title 10 training if you’re a member of the Reserves or Guard)
Be a resident of New Hampshire

Unremarried surviving spouses of veterans who were killed during active duty can qualify for a different (larger) property tax credit.

Property Tax Credit for Disabled Veterans & Surviving Spouses
Disabled veterans living in homes that have not been specially adapted can also qualify for a property tax credit. The amount can range from $700 to $2000. To be eligible, you must:

Be a veteran who is paraplegic or has with a permanent and complete service-related disability or , a double amputation,, or paraplegic or be an unremarried surviving spouse of a deceased veteran
Live in the property as your primary residence

To find out if you can get this tax credit, you can contact your county tax assessor.

Property Tax Exemption on Specially Adapted Homesteads
You may be completely exempt from paying real estate property tax if you and your home meet the following qualifications:

You are a veteran with a permanent and total service-related disability, including blindness, paraplegia, or double amputation
You own a specially-adapted property that you bought with VA assistance (or that you bought using the money you earned selling a previous property that you bought with VA assistance)

If you’re the surviving spouse of a veteran who was eligible, you may also be eligible. Check with your county tax assessor to learn more.

New Jersey

Property Tax Deduction for Veterans
You may qualify to get a deduction on your property taxes every year if you meet one of the following conditions:

You’re an honorably discharged veteran of wartime
You participated in peacekeeping operations or missions
You’re an unmarried surviving spouse or partner of a veteran

You can apply for this deduction with your municipal tax collector.

Property Tax Exemption for Disabled Veterans
Some veterans may even qualify for a full exemption from property taxes. To be eligible, you must:

Live on the property as your main residence
Have a complete and permanent disability
Be a wartime veteran or a veteran of certain peacekeeping operations or missions

Unmarried surviving spouses and other partners may also qualify. To apply for the exemption, you will need to turn in the form to your municipal tax collector.

New Mexico

If you’ve been rated by the VA with a 100% complete and permanent disability, you may qualify for a waiver of the property tax on your primary residence. You must be a legal New Mexico resident.

To apply for this benefit, you can fill out the application form and submit it to the address at the bottom of the form, along with:

Proof of your New Mexico residency
Your military discharge document showing the character of your discharge

If you’re the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran and haven’t remarried, you may be eligible for this tax break. Some documents you’ll need include:

Proof of your New Mexico residency
A copy of the veteran’s death certificate
The veteran’s discharge document

You’ll need to fill out the same application form that veterans use, and then send it and the above documents to the address at the bottom of the form.

New York

New York offers several property tax exemptions for veterans, which can apply to taxes from your county, city, town, village, and/or school district. Exemptions are in the following categories:

Cold War Veterans’ Exemption – For the residential property taxes of a veteran who served in the Cold War, with additional benefits for veterans with service-related disabilities.
Alternative Veterans’ Exemption – For the residential property taxes of a veteran who served during certain wartime periods or campaigns, with additional benefits for veterans with service-related disabilities.
Eligible Funds Exemption – For a partial exemption on property that a veteran or other eligible person buys using money from a pension, bonus, or insurance.

Check with your local tax assessor or clerk for more details on these benefits or to apply.

Additionally, your state locality may extend your property tax payment period if you have been ordered to active duty because of a declaration of war, period of combat defined by executive order, or hazardous duty. Speak with your local property tax office to learn more.

North Carolina

NC Home Advantage Tax Credit
This credit helps first-time homebuyers and military veterans save on annual property taxes, allowing you more money to put toward your mortgage payment. Using an MCC, you can save up to $2,000 annually.

Disabled Veteran Homestead Exemption
North Carolina offers eligible veterans with disabilities a real estate property tax exemption of the first $45,000 of your assessed real property value. You may be eligible if you are:

An honorably-discharged veteran with a service-related complete 100% disability or are VA-rated as Permanently Individually Unemployable OR
An unremarried, surviving spouse of a veteran who was disabled and areis receiving Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC).

To apply for this benefit, fill out the NCDVA-9 form, submit it to the address on the form, then submit the returned and certified form to your county tax office before the deadline listed on the form.

North Dakota

There are two possible property tax exemptions veterans or their unremarried surviving spouses may qualify for in North Dakota:

Disabled Veterans Credit
(see NDCC 57-02-08.8)

Paraplegic Veterans Exemption
(see NDCC 57-02-08, para 20.a)
$3,375–$6,750
reduction of tax value, based on disability %

$120,000
exemption of market value

While these exemptions seem to be for very different amounts at first glance, they actually end up being quite comparable because of how North Dakota calculates property taxes.

How Property Taxes Are Calculated in North Dakota

First, assessors determine the fair market property value, which is what people would be willing to pay to buy the home.

The home’s assessed value is then calculated based off of the market value. In North Dakota, the assessed value is always 50% of the market value.

Next, the taxable value is determined. In North Dakota, the taxable value of a home is only 9% of the assessed value.

Finally, the taxable value is multiplied by your county’s property tax rate.

To more accurately compare the two different types of veteran exemptions, let’s say we have two veterans living in Fargo. Both live in homes that have a market value of $200,000. Veteran 1 is 100% disabled. Veteran 2 is paraplegic.

When Veteran 1’s property taxes get calculated, they look like this:

$200,000 x 0.50 = $100,000 assessed value –>
$100,000 x 0.09 = $9,000 taxable value –>
$9,000 – $6,750 exemption = $2,250 adjusted taxable value –>
$2,250 x 0.01629 (tax rate for Cass County) = $36.65 in property taxes

But when Veteran 2’s property taxes get calculated, they look like this:

$200,000 – $120,000 exemption = $80,000 adjusted market value
$80,000 x 0.50 = $40,000 assessed value –>
$40,000 x 0.09 = $3,600 taxable value –>
$3,600 x 0.01629 (tax rate for Cass County) = $58.64 in property taxes

How to Qualify

To qualify for the Disabled Veterans Credit, you will need to:

Be at least 50% or more disabled
Have an honorable discharge or be retired from the Armed Forces
Own & occupy the home you’re claiming the credit for

To qualify for the full amount ($6,750), you will need to have either a 100% disability rating or an extra-schedular rating that brings your total disability rating to 100%.

The amount you qualify for depends on your total rating:

Disability Percentage
Taxable Reduction
100%
$6,750
90%
$6,075
80%
$5,400
70%
$4,725
60%
$4,050
50%
$3,375

To qualify for the paraplegic veterans exemption, a veteran must either be paraplegic or have been awarded specially adapted housing by the VA.

How to Apply

If you qualify for the 50% (or greater) disabled veterans exemption, you will apply by filling out the application form. The deadline is February 1, but you only need to apply once, unless your disability rating changes or as requested.

When you apply for the first time, you will also need to include copies of the following documents with your application:

Your DD-214 form
A certificate from the VA that states your disability percentage

Once everything is ready to go, you should send it to your county’s Tax Equalization office.

Contact the same office They’re also who you’ll need to contact to get more information and instructions on how to apply for the paraplegic veterans exemption.if you qualify for the paraplegic veterans exemption

Ohio

Disabled veterans in Ohio can qualify for a property tax exemption of $50,000.

This exemption works by reducing the home’s market value before the assessed value is calculated. So, if you have a $200,000 home, you will only end up paying property taxes on $150,000 of it.

How to Qualify

All veterans, including those who served in the reserves or as a member of a National Guard unity, can qualify, if they also meet the following conditions below. They must have:

Have a total disability rating for a service-connected disability
Received a A military discharge that was under honorable conditions
Have bBeen disabled on or before Jan. 1 of the year they’reyou’re seeking the exemption

Surviving spouses who live in the same home the veteran lived in can also qualify.

How to Apply

You will need to download and fill out the application form. As proof of your eligibility, you will also need to submit some additional documents, including with your application form. These include a copy of your DD-214 form and your awards letter that shows your disability rating.

Once your application is complete, you will need to send it to your county auditor for filing by December 31. If you have any questions about the exemption, or if you need help completing the application, you can give them a call, and they can assist you.

Your application only needs to be filed once. After being approved for the exemption, you will continue to receive it automatically.

Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, qualified veterans or their surviving spouses can be fully exempt from property taxes. The exemption applies to the fair cash value of their homestead, and is given as part of Oklahoma’s Constitution (Article X, Section 8E).

How to Qualify

In addition to those who served in a branch of the Armed Forces, Oklahoma’s homestead exemption also applies to veterans who have served in the Oklahoma National Guard. Regardless of your specific branch, in order to be eligible, you must also meet all of the following conditions in order to be eligible:

Have an honorable discharge
Have a service-connected disability
Be 100% disabled, as certified by the VA
Be a current resident of Oklahoma

You’re also required to own the home and have lived in it since January 1 of the year you’re applying for the exemption. In addition, evidence of your ownership, such as the deed, must be recorded with your county clerk’s office by February 1.

How to Apply

If you qualify for this exemption, the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) should have already sent you a letter stating that you’re qualified. If you haven’t received this letter and you believe you are qualified, you can call the ODVA at (888) 655-2838.

Once you have the qualification letter from the Oklahoma VA, you can apply for the exemption by filling out the Application for 100% Disabled Veterans Real Property Tax Exemption. Once you fill out the application, you will need to submit it to your county assessor along with the following documentation:

The original qualification letter from the Oklahoma VA
Your original awards letter from the VA that states your disability and/or compensation rating

You only need to apply for the Disabled Veterans Homestead Exemption once. After that, the benefit should continue each year automatically.

To find out where to submit your application and supporting documents, you should contact the tax assessor for your county. They can also answer any questions you might have.

Oregon

Exemptions for Veterans with Disabilities or Surviving Spouses
If you’re an Oregon veteran with disabilities or a surviving spouse/registered partner, you may qualify to exempt a portion of your home’s value from property taxes. The amount you can receive for the exemption is substantial, equaling thousands of dollars and rising by 3% annually.

You may be eligible if:

You’re a veteran with a certified disability of at least 40%
You’re the surviving spouse/partner of a veteran (the veteran spouse/partner does not need to have been disabled)
Your total gross income in the last year was not over the limit, which is 185% of the poverty guidelines

Apply for this exemption through your county assessor, or by completing and following the instructions on and completing the Disabled Veteran or Surviving Spouse Exemption Claim. On the form, you’ll also find more about eligibility requirements and other details.

Exemptions for Active Duty Servicemembers
Active duty servicemembers in Oregon may be eligible for a property tax exemption as well. You may qualify if you:

Are on active duty (including if you’re in the Guard or Reserves)
Are an Oregon resident who lives in the home as a primary residence
Have served for over 178 consecutive days under Title 10 status or EMAC deployment (a regular tour of duty or regular active enlistment does not qualify).

Apply for the active duty exemption by filling out and following the instructions on the Oregon Active Duty Military Service Member’s Exemption Claim form. Included on the form is more information about exemption requirements, amounts, and other details.

Pennsylvania

Disabled veterans who are residents of Pennsylvania can qualify for a 100% property tax exemption, which means you would owe $0 for your property taxes.

How to Qualify

In order to receive this exemption, you must meet one of the following disability requirements:

Be 100% disabled, as rated by the VA, for a service-connected disability
Be bilaterally paraplegic of either your upper or lower extremities
Be blind (three-sixtieths or ten two-hundredths worse than normal vision)

You will also need to meet the service requirements, which include service during specific dates and an honorable release or discharge.

Other requirements include establishing financial need as well as owning and living in the home as your primary residence.

How to Apply

To apply, you will need to contact your county’s Veterans Affairs Director. They can provide you with the application and the information necessary to complete it. If you have any questions, they can answer those for you as well.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island law allows veterans to receive property tax exemptions and credits. However, The amount ofhow much the exemption or credit is for depends on which city/municipality you live in.

To find more details on some of the options in your location, the Rhode Island Department of Revenue has put together a report for the main types of veteran exemptions and their amounts in each municipality.

How to Qualify

The basic qualifications for the general exemption are:

A discharge other than dishonorable
Service during an approved wartime period

Additional exemptions may have their own eligibility criteria. For example, you could qualify for a Prisoner of War exemption in Barrington if you live there and were a POW.

How to Apply

Because there are so many possible veteran exemptions in Rhode Island, the easiest way to find out which ones you’re eligible for—and how much you’re eligible for—is to contact your town’s tax assessor. They’ll be able to let you know the deadlines and help you through the application process.

When you contact them, be prepared with a copy of your DD-214 form, as it will likely be required as documentation of your eligibility.

South Carolina

According to South Carolina’s legal code §12-37-220, a veteran can receive a full property tax exemption of their home and up to five acres of land.

How to Qualify

In order to be eligible for the exemption, you must fall under one of these categories:

Veteran with a service-connected disability that is total and permanent
Prisoner of War (POW) during WWI, WWII, the Korean War, or the Vietnam War
Recipient of the medal of honor

Only those in the first category receive the five-acre land exemption. Only one acre of land is exempt for those who qualify because they are a former POW or Medal of Honor recipient.

The surviving spouse of a servicemember may also qualify for the same exemption if they remain unmarried and receive ownership of the home. They must also continue living there.

How to Apply

You will need to fill out the Property Tax Exemption Application for Individuals form (PT-401-I). In addition to the application form, yYou will also need to include additional documentation, including:

A copy of the recorded deed for the home
Proof of legal residence in the home
A letter from the VA

Depending on which category you qualify under, the VA letter will need to include specific information. If you’re a POW or Medal of Honor recipient, the letter simply needs to verify this fact.

However, if you are qualifying as a disabled veteran, you can either send a Summary of Benefits letter, or another letter from the VA that contains:

The effective date of your disability
Verification that your disability is total, permanent, and service-connected
The signature of your County Service Officer

After you have filled out the application form and gathered the necessary documents, you can submit everything in one of four ways:

EMAIL
Property.Exemptions@dor.sc.gov
MAIL
South Carolina Department of Revenue, Government Services Division
PO Box 125
Columbia, SC 29214
FAX
803-896-0151
IN PERSON
Taxpayer Assistance Office†

†A list of local taxpayer offices can be found online.

If you have any questions about the application or additional documentation, you can call the South Carolina Department of Revenue at 803-898-5700.

South Dakota

In South Dakota, veterans can potentially qualify for one of two property tax exemptions:

Disabled Veterans Credit
(see NDCC 57-02-08.8)

Paraplegic Veterans Exemption
(see NDCC 57-02-08, para 20.a)
$150,000
exemption of assessed value

$120,000
exemption of market value

South Dakota has set up special property tax exemptions for eligible veterans. Visit their website to see if any of the exemptions below fit your living situation.

To apply for exemptions, look for the appropriate application on the South Dakota Department of Revenue website.

Totally Disabled Veterans and Their Widow or Widower
This benefit exempts $100,000 of the value of a home from taxation if a totally disabled veteran owns and lives in it—as long as the veteran became disabled because of their service. This exemption can also apply to a surviving spouse of the veteran.

Exemption for Paraplegic Veterans or Their Surviving Spouse
This benefit gives a property tax exemption on a home (usually on less than one acre of land) that was designed for paraplegics and is wheelchair-friendly. This type of exemption applies if a veteran has lost the use of both lower extremities, and has they’ve owned and lived in the home for at least one full calendar year. TIf the veteran has passed, the exemption can also be granted to their veteran’s widow or widower, if the veteran has passed.

Totally Disabled Veterans and Their Widow or Widower
This benefit exempts $100,000 of the value of a home from taxation if a totally disabled veteran owns and lives in it—as long as the veteran became disabled because of theirhis or her service. This exemption can also apply to a surviving spouse of the veteran.

Visit their website to see if any of the exemptions fit your living situation.

To apply for exemptions, look for the appropriate application on the South Dakota Department of Revenue website.

Tennessee

Property tax relief for veterans in Tennessee comes in the form of a reimbursement on the first $175,000 of your home’s full market value. You are required to pay your property taxes in full every year, and then apply for a reimbursement.

For qualified veterans, the reimbursement is calculated in a series of steps:

Multiply the first $175,000 of your home’s value by the applicable appraisal ratio
Multiple the answer in Step 1 by Tennessee’s appraised value rate of 25%
Multiply the answer in Step 2 by your local tax rate(s) to determine your reimbursement amount

Property Taxes in Tennessee
In Tennessee, you generally pay property taxes to both the county and the city. These amounts are calculated separately because they have different tax rates.

In Real Numbers
Say your home in Memphis has a fair market value of $200,000, so your home’s assessed value is $50,000. The property tax rate for Memphis is $3.195986 for every $100 of the assessed value, which means you would pay a total of $1,597.99 to the city. In addition, the tax rate for Shelby County is $4.05 for every $100, so you wouldpay a total of $2,025 to the county. All together, you’d pay $3,622.99 in property taxes.

However, when the reimbursement on this home is calculated for Shelby County, it should look like this:

$175,000 x 0.8808 Shelby County appraisal ratio = $154,140
$154,140 x 0.25 appraised value rate = $38,535
$38,535 ÷ 100 x $4.05 = $1,560.66 reimbursement

And when the reimbursement gets calculated for Memphis, there is no applicable appraisal ratio for us to apply, which means the calculation for your reimbursement would look like this:

$175,000 x 0.8808 Shelby County appraisal ratio = $154,140
154,140 x 0.25 appraised value rate = $38,535
$38,535 ÷ 100 x $3.195986 = $1,231.57 reimbursement

All told, your total property tax reimbursement would be $2,792.23† in this example.

†This is not an official estimate; the calculations performed by your county/city may be more exact and are the only official calculations.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the veterans property tax exemption in Tennessee, a veteran cannot have been dishonorably discharged, and they must live in and own the home. In addition, they must have a service-connected disability that meets one of the following conditions:

AHas a permanent and total disability determination from the VA
A Is rated as 100% permanent and total disability rating resulting from and was caused by being a POW
A disability that iIncludes the paralysis or amputation of two or more limbs, paraplegia, or legal blindness

Surviving spouses may also qualify if the veteran was eligible at the time of their death, if they died from a combat-related cause, or if they died while deployed. However, eligibility will only continue as long as the spouse continues to own the home, doesn’t remarry, and only uses the property as a home.

How to Apply

Because property taxes in Tennessee are administered and paid at the county and city levels, you will need to contact your county trustee for instructions on how to apply and to access to any forms you will need to fill out. Make sure you ask if there’s also a city reimbursement you could qualify for.

You can begin your application each year after receiving the property tax bill for your city and/or county. Typically, the application deadline is 35 days after the delinquency date, though your county trustee will be able to confirm the specific deadlines in your area.

Texas

Depending on your disability rating, veterans in Texas can qualify for a full or partial property tax exemption.

Full exemptions are reserved for 100% disabled veterans, while partial exemptions are available to veterans who have a disability rating from 10–90%. The partial exemption can range anywhere from $5,000 to $12,000; this amount is always applied as a reduction of your home’s assessed value.

How to Qualify

To qualify for a full property tax exemption, you must:

Have a service-connected disability
Receive a 100% disability compensation from the VA
Have a 100% disabled or individual unemployability rating
Own and live in the home

To qualify for a partial exemption, you will need to have a disability rating from the VA that’s between 10 and 90%. How much you qualify for will depend on your disability percentage, which falls into four tiers:

Disability Percentage
Reduction of
Assessed Value
70%
$12,000
50%
$10,000
30%
$7,500
10%
$5,000

In addition, veterans can actually receive the largest reduction of $12,000 even if they don’t meet the 70% disability minimum, as long as they meet just one of the following additional qualifications :

Be 65 years or older with a 10% (or greater) disability rating
Be totally blind in one or both eyes
Be unable to use one or more limbs

Finally, surviving spouses can qualify for either the full or partial exemption after their spouse dies as long as they remain unmarried and are the owner and occupier of the home. They will only qualify for the amount the veteran would have received (or was already receiving).

In situations where the veteran dies while on active duty (and therefore never received a disability rating), the surviving spouse will qualify for a $5,000 assessed value reduction. However, if the veteran is killed in action, their spouse can receive a total property tax exemption.

How to Apply

To apply for the full exemption, you will need to print and fill out the Residence Homestead Exemption Application (Form 50-114). You will also need to provide a copy of your driver’s license (or state ID) and documentation that verifies your 100% disability rating.

To apply for the partial exemption, you will need to print and fill out the Application for Disabled Veteran’s or Survivor’s Exemption (Form 50-135). You’ll then submit the completed form, along with a letter from the VA detailing your most recent disability rating.

The deadline for both applications is April 30 of the year you’re requesting the exemption, though you are legally allowed to submit a late application if it’s within one of the following two timelines:

Up to two years after the deadline has passed for the full exemption
Up to five and five years after the deadlineit has passed for the partial exemption.

Your application and supporting documents should be sent to your county’s Aappraisal Ddistrict office. In addition, you can contact them with any questions and to find out if there are local county exemptions you may also qualify for.

Utah

In Utah, disabled veterans can receive a property tax exemption. The exact amount of the exemption depends on your disability rating, with the maximum amount being $266,670 of your home’s taxable value.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the property tax exemption, you must:

Have a 10% or greater service-connected disability
Own and live in the home as your primary residence
Have an honorable discharge from service

Surviving spouses of a qualified veteran may also qualify after the veteran passes if they own the home and do not remarry.

How to Apply

You will need to contact your county’s tax assessor for the application. Once it’s complete, return the application form back to your county assessor, along with proof of your VA disability rating.

Other Military Property Tax Exemption

In addition to the exemption available for disabled veterans, Utah also offers a property tax exemption for active duty military members. This exemption applies if you own a home in Utah but are currently stationed in another state.

If you qualify, you must apply for the exemption by September 1. To get a copy of the application, contact the county tax assessor where the property is located. Once you’ve completed the application form, you will need to return it to the county assessor, along with a copy of your military orders. You are requiredYou will then need to reapply annually for the active duty exemption.

Vermont

In Vermont, qualified veterans must receive a $10,000 minimum property tax exemption [32 V.S.A. § 3802(11)(A)], though you could receive up to $40,000 depending on the town you live in.

This exemption works, regardless of the specific amount, by reducing the appraised value of your home before your county’s property tax rate is applied.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the exemption, you must be a veteran, or the unremarried surviving spouse of a veteran, who meets one of the following criteria:

Have a 50% or greater service-connected disability for which you receive VA compensation
Receive Improved Pension payments from the VA
Collect permanent medical retirement pay from the VA

You must also own the home and live in it as your primary residence.

How to Apply

To apply, you will need to fill out the Property Tax Exemption for Disabled Veterans and Their Survivors form and gather documentation from the VA or Department of Defense that verifies your disability rating, pension payments, or medical retirement pay.

Once the form is complete and you have the required eligibility documentation, you are ready to submit your application. The deadline is May 1, and you must either mail, fax, or drop it off in person at Vermont’s Office of Veterans Affairs.

The form and eligibility documentation must be filled out and submitted every year unless you have:

Received a total and permanent disability rating from the VA
Been 50% or more disabled for 10 consecutive years
Received a permanent medical retirement
Qualified as a surviving spouse and have not remarried

Virginia

Disabled veterans in Virginia and surviving spouses of some veterans can qualify for a complete property tax exemption on their home if they meet the eligibility requirements.

How to Qualify

The eligibility requirements for Virginia’s veterans property tax exemption state that the veteran must:

Have a service-connected disability that is permanent and total
Be 100% disabled or have a 100% individual unemployability rating
Have been alive on or after January 1, 2011
Own and occupy the home as their principal residence

In addition, the spouse of a veteran who met the above requirements before passing away or dieds or wais killed in action can also qualify, as long as the spousey does not remarry.

While the surviving spouse of a servicemember killed in action or who died of wounds can transfer the exemption to another property, the surviving spouse of any other qualified veteran must continue living in the home in order to keep the exemption.

In both cases, the veteran must have been alive on or after January 1, 2011 for their spouse to qualify.

How to Apply

Because property taxes in Virginia are managed by local governments and not the state, you will need to contact the Commissioner of Revenue through your local tax office for deadlines and instructions on how to apply.

Virginia’s state tax website provides an interactive map of Virginia’s counties. ; when you cClick on your county to, you can find a link to your local government’s website, where you should be able to access find the contact information for your Commissioner of Revenue.

Washington

In 2019, Washington amended its property tax exemption laws to expand the eligibility to a greater number of disabled veterans. The amount of your exemption will fall into one of three categories, depending on your income level:

Income Threshold 1
Income Threshold 2
Income Threshold 3
$60,000 or 60%†
of your home’s valuation
$50,000 or 35%†
of your home’s valuation
All Excess Property Taxes‡

†The amount granted is whichever is greater (however, for income threshold 2, it is capped at $70,000)
‡Excess property taxes are defined as those that have been approved by voters to fund a specific purpose, such as public schools, maintenance levies, county increases to the regular property tax, etc.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for the property tax exemption, you must:

Have an 80% or greater service-connected disability
Own the home and occupy it as your principal residence for at least nine months of the year†
Meet one of the three income threshold requirements‡

In addition, surviving spouses can also qualify, as long as they are at least 57 years old, and meet the ownership, occupancy, and income requirements.

†If you do not live in your home because you have been confined to a hospital, nursing home, assisted living facility, or a relative’s home for long-term care, you will still meet the occupancy requirement.

‡The calculation of your disposable income for purposes of the income threshold categories does not include military pay, disability payments, dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC), etc. Certain types of medical care costs can also be deducted.

How to Apply

To apply, you will need to download and fill out the Application for Senior Citizen and Disabled Persons Exemption from Real Property Taxes form. You will also need to submit written proof of your disability rating from the VA or, if you prefer, a completed Proof of Disability Affidavit form.

Once your application form and supporting documentation are ready, you will submit them to your county assessor’s office. Because the application deadline varies by county, you will want to contact them early to find out what it is in your area.

In addition, if you have any other questions about the exemption or the application process, your county assessor will be able to answer them.

Other Property Tax Relief Programs

In addition to the property tax exemption, Washington also offers a Property Tax Assistance Program for Widows or Widowers of Veterans.

The requirements for this program are very similar to the requirements for the disabled veterans exemption, with parts of the law even referring to RCW 84.36.381.

However, unlike requirements for veterans, the widow(er) needs to be 62 and does not need to meet any income requirements. The program also expands eligibility based on the manner of the veteran’s death.

There are also other tax relief programs available that, though they’re are not specific to veterans,. However, are worth learning about since you may still qualify. You can contact your county assessor to learn more about each of these options.

West Virginia

In West Virginia, disabled veterans can receive a property tax exemption on their home that subtracts $20,000 from the assessed value.

How to Qualify

In order to receive this benefit, your disability must be:

Caused by your military service
Rated 100% by the VA
Permanent and total

How to Apply

You will need to verify that your disability meets the above conditions by contacting the VA for a written certification. After you receive that letter, you will need to contact the Tax Assessor for your county to get the application form.

Wisconsin

Eligible veterans in Wisconsin can receive a credit for the full amount of their property taxes on their primary residence and up to one acre of land.

You will need to pay your property taxes in full; the credit works by refunding you the amount after they’ve been paid.

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for Wisconsin’s Disabled Veterans and Unremarried Surviving Spouses Property Tax Credit Program, you must:

Have a service-connected disability
Be rated 100% disabled or have a 100% individual unemployability rating
Have served active duty under honorable conditions
Have been a Wisconsin resident when you entered active duty or for five consecutive years after entering into service
Be a current resident of Wisconsin

After you die, your surviving spouse can also continue to receive the credit, as long as they don’t remarry and they qualify for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) from the VA.

How to Apply

To start the application process for the very first time, you will need to verify your eligibility with the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs (WDVA) before doing anything else. You can do this by filling out form WDVA 2097 and mailing it to the Wisconsin VA’s office, along with the following documents:

An original version of form WDVA 1805
A copy of your DD-214 form
A copy of your service-connected disability notification letter from the federal VA, dated within the last 12 months

If a surviving spouse is applying, they will also need to submit a certified death certificate and a certified marriage certificate.

Once the Wisconsin VA receives all of the necessary forms and documentation, they will review the information and, if you qualify, mail you a certification of eligibility.

After receiving this certification, you will finish the application process when you file your state income tax return. You’ll do this by attaching a copy (not the original) of the certification and a copy of your property tax bill for the year you’re trying to receive the credit.

Important Note: Even if you don’t owe any income tax, you still need to file a state return in order to apply for and receive the benefit.

To reapply for the credit in subsequent years, you do not need to recertify your eligibility with the VA, and you do not need to resubmit a copy of your certification letter. Instead, you just need to file your state tax return with an attached copy of that year’s property tax bill.

Have Questions?
You can view a list of FAQs about the credit online, or you can call the Wisconsin Department of Revenue at 608-266-2486 for specific questions about the credit or its application process.

If you have questions about your eligibility, those should be directed to WDVA by calling 800-947-8387.

Wyoming

Disabled veterans living in Wyoming can receive a $3,000 property tax exemption of their home’s assessed value.

How to Qualify

In order to be eligible for the exemption, you must have:

Been honorably discharged from service
Served during one of the approved periods
Been a resident of Wyoming for at least three consecutive years

If a veteran would have qualified for the exemption prior to their death, their unremarried surviving spouse may also qualify.

How to Apply

You can pick up the application form at your local county treasurer’s office. After completing the form, you will need to return it to your county treasurer, along with any of the following documents as proof of your honorable discharge:

DD-214
DD-214N
DD-214MC
WD AGO 53-55
NAVMC 78-PD
NAVPERS-533

The deadline for your application (and supporting documentation) is the fourth Monday in May, and you will need to reapply for the exemption every year.

Are There Any Other Property Tax Exemptions I Can Get?

The short answer is, “It depends.”

The exemptions covered in this post are only those that have been enacted at the state level. However, because many states administer property taxes at the county or municipal level, there may be additional veteran property tax exemptions that are unique to your city or county.

The best way to know what all of the exemptions you qualify for is to contact your local government tax office. Often this is the assessor’s office, but it could also be your county auditor or other similar official.

How Do I Know What to Ask?

Once you track down who is in charge of property taxes in your area, you need to know what questions to ask. Property tax laws are not always the most clear or straightforward, so knowing the right questions can make all the difference. Here are some you’ll want to ask:

Are there any additional property tax exemptions for veterans at the county level?
What about my city? Does it have any property exemptions for veterans?
Can I receive other exemptions and combine them with a veteran-specific one?
Can I apply for a property tax exemption retroactively if I was eligible but didn’t know it, or can I receive a refund equal to the exemption for the years I paid but was eligible?

Here to Help You Save

At Low VA Rates, our goal is always to help save you money and make owning a home more affordable. Even though we don’t personally do a lot with property taxes, we’re willing to step outside of our lane if it can help make your monthly mortgage payment smaller or more manageable.

Because property tax laws can vary so much from state to state and county to county, it can be hard to know what benefits are even available to you. And we would hate for you to miss out on savings simply because you just didn’t know.

To that end, we hope you found a property tax exemption that can save you money on your mortgage payment. If you did, drop us a comment and tell us what you saved. We love hearing a happy ending.

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